1967 Chevrolet Impala SS

2dr Convertible

8-cyl. 327cid/275hp 4bbl L30

#1 Concours condition#1 Concours
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#2 Excellent condition#2 Excellent
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#3 Good condition#3 Good
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#4 Fair condition#4 Fair
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Model overview

Model description

For 1967, full-size Chevrolets were facelifted around the same basic shape as 1965-66 with distinctive tweaks. The coke bottle shape was exaggerated, and front and rear fenders had a pinch line along the top. The two-door Hardtop now had a long smooth roofline, sweeping down the trunk. The grille was extended to wrap around the front fenders, a collapsible steering column was added, disc brakes were now optional and shoulder belts fitted to closed cars. The 1967 Chevrolet Impala was still the company’s best seller with 575,600 sales. Impala Super Sport sales totaled 76,055.

The Impala had six models: two- and four-door Hardtops, four-door Sedan, a Convertible and six-passenger and nine-passenger wagons. The Super Sport series offered a two-door Hardtop and Convertible with all vinyl interior, bucket seats and console, badges, blackout grille and special hubcaps. The Impala SS 427 package included a power-dome hood, stiffer suspension and bigger wheels.

Base engine was still the 155 bhp six or the 195 bhp 283 cid V-8. Optional engines included the 275 bhp, L30 327 ($92.70), 325 bhp L35 396, ($158) and the 385 bhp L36 427 that was included with the SS 427 package for $316. An additional 425 bhp L72 427 engine available for $542.45. Only 2,124 Super Sports were equipped with 427 engines.

A 4-speed M20 manual gearbox was optional for all V-8 engines for $184. The Powerglide 2-speed automatic was optional for all engines except the 427 V-8 and cost $184 with a six-cylinder and $195 with a V-8. The 3-speed Turbo-Hydramatic transmission cost $226.

Popular luxury options included air conditioning, special instrumentation ($79), tinted glass ($37), power brakes ($42), power steering ($95), power windows ($100), and four-way power seat ($70). AM/FM stereo cost $239, a tachometer was $48 with a V-8, and a vinyl roof cost $79. Front and rear bumper guards were $32, and cruise control cost $50. A tilt steering column cost $42 and a sport steering wheel was $32.

Chevrolet offered 15 exterior colors for the 1967 Impala and seven two-tones. They were Tuxedo Black, (AA), Ermine White (CC), Nantucket Blue (DD), Deepwater Blue (EE), Marina Blue (FF), Granada Gold (GG), Mountain Green (HH), Emerald Turquoise (KK), Tahoe Turquoise (LL), Royal Plum (MM), Madeira Maroon (NN), Bolero Red (RR), Sierra Fawn (SS), Capri Cream Tan (TT) and Butternut Yellow (YY).

Two-tone color combinations included (top color first) Ermine White/Nantucket Blue, Ermine White/Tahoe Turquoise, Nantucket Blue/Ermine White, Nantucket Blue/Deepwater Blue, Capri Cream/Granada Gold and Capri Cream/Sierra Fawn.

Interior colors were Black, White, Blue, Green, Red, Fawn, Aqua, and Gold. Impala and Super Sport convertible tops could be black, white medium blue or fawn, and color keyed interiors were a mix of cloth and vinyl, or vinyl in the case of Super Sports and Impala hardtops. Vinyl roofs were typically Black, White, Green, Blue or Tan.

Chevrolet’s decision to push muscle into full-size cars faced the problem of increased weight, compared to the mid-sized Chevelle that weighed several hundred pounds less. However, the division sold 66,510 Super Sport Hardtops and 9,545 Convertibles. A ’67 Impala SS 427 Hardtop turned 0-60 mph in 8.4 seconds and 15.8 seconds for the quarter-mile.

Model specs

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