German Collectibles

Index of post-war German collectible cars

As it did in September 2019, Hagerty’s German Car Index remained steady for the past four months with a modest drop of 1 percent. Nearly three-quarters of the component cars recorded no movement at all. Three of them dropped, including previously red-hot Porsches like the 1973 911 Carrera RS Touring (one of the more expensive cars in the index) with a 12 percent decrease and the 1979 930, which continued its gradual slide with a 6 percent decrease. The only serious gain of any car in the index this past period was for the Mercedes-Benz 280SL, which bounced back with a 17 percent surge after two years of continuous drops.

As has been the case for the past several updates, the most dynamic parts of the German car market are outside of this index, particularly among newer and/or more affordable models. Volkswagens in particular had a strong showing, with every post-1952 Beetle recording significant gains along with Type 181 Things, Karmann Ghias and Sciroccos. Most Mercedes-Benz sedans from the 1980s and 1990s also recorded gains, and it’s a similar story for many BMWs of the same period. High build quality, clean styling, premium badges, and large and loyal fanbases for a low cost of entry continues to attract enthusiasts to these cars, and their prices are rising as a result. The more traditionally “classic” German cars in the index, meanwhile, are less dynamic but still mostly holding firm.

- Andrew Newton, January 2020

The Hagerty Price Guide Index of German Cars is a stock market style index that averages the values of 21 of the most sought after cars from BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Porsche from the 1950s-70s. The list below shows the cars that make up the index, while the graph to the left shows this index’s average value over the years. Values are for #2 condition, or “excellent” cars.

This index includes