In the latest Redline Update, Davin gets us up to speed on the Cadillac 365 V-8 and Honda Trail 70 projects.

First off, he inventories the Cadillac parts that remain after he disassembled the mill. The lifters show varying levels of wear, with the worst offenders displaying significant dishing. Those won’t be reused. New parts will join the original camshaft, which is being reground. Davin was surprised to find a new water pump; the big casting is pretty complicated, so it’s good to know that the cooling system will benefit from fresh components.

Plenty of the original Cadillac parts will be put back in service, however, and Davin reviews some of the steps used to restore them. For example, the V-8’s pushrods went through the parts washer and then through a tumbler filled with solvent and stainless rods to remove the baked-on oil. Now, they look brand-new. The rocker shaft assembly shows what the valvetrain parts looked like before that treatment. The shaft and its components are going into the ultrasonic cleaner before it heads to the tumbler. Due to the wear on the rocker tips, the rockers will need further work, since the ridges left by the valve stems need to be ground smooth.

Besides the tumbler and other parts washers, Davin and the Redline Rebuild crew rely on a media blaster. A quick trip to that part of the shop shows the valve covers getting stripped and readied for the same paint that will eventually coat them and the rest of the engine.

On to the Honda Trail 70, Davin lists all the new parts that he’s already collected, including clutch plates and a rebuild kit for the stator, plus brake shoes, sprockets, a battery, and an OE chrome engine guard. More and more original parts are going into the bin that’s destined for Jason’s Chrome, which will re-plate all those components in addition to polishing all the aluminum bits, including the intake manifold. Other aluminum parts, like the side case, will be sandblasted and Cerakoted. We also get a peek at the stamped steel frame, which is stripped of its stickers and nearly ready for sandblasting. The rusty split rims are also ready to get sandblasted. If they’re not too pitted, they’ll be powder-coated, but Davin’s lined up replacements just in case.

Next, the video team heads to Thirlby Machine Shop, where the heads get disassembled before being thoroughly cleaned along with the block. As previously discovered, one of the exhaust manifolds is cracked from the center port almost all the way to the collector; Davin plans to drill out the crack and weld up the cast iron. Luckily, the block passes its magnetic crack check with flying colors. Mike at Thirlby will handle boring, honing, and decking the block, making sure to leave the stamping on the deck surface intact. Compared to some of the other projects Davin has brought him, this Cadillac should be a cakewalk.

Finally, Davin reconditions the stock rods by pressing in new bolts, cleaning up the rod caps, and resizing the big end. As parts continue to show up, including the pistons and back-ordered fuel-pump rebuild kit, we’ll continue to bring you progress reports. Make sure you’re subscribed to Hagerty’s YouTube channel so you don’t miss a single one.

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Grease and grime are staples of the Redline Rebuild garage, but this week is all about cleaning up. No, not the shop, but the Cadillac 365 V-8 that Davin tore down last week. This sturdy iron block is shaping up to be Davin’s main project and it’s time to fire up the parts washer.

“This engine is going back to bone-stock, unlike a lot of the other builds we have done,” says Davin. “Not that we couldn’t add a few subtle hot rod parts … it’s just that, in this case, that approach doesn’t make much sense, because the engine’s going back into a bone-stock four-door cruiser. Stock is best here.”

The mess of parts on the workbench has to be cleaned before the process can move ahead much further, and, for this step, Davin is happy to have his monster parts washer. All the bits and pieces that need to go to the machine shop get a quick bath to remove the worst of the grime before they’re loaded into the bed of the 1950 Chevrolet for a trip across town, where they are unloaded and placed in the waiting line at Thirlby machine shop.

The next step is machine work—sort of. Since both Thirlby’s facing a backlog of work, Davin shifts his focus to even more cleaning. He gathers all small parts that he’ll send out for paint, powdercoat, or CeraKote and begins washing and sandblasting like a madman.

Be sure to tune in next week to see whether Davin finds good news under all that oil and dirt. All the progress will be documented in upcoming Redline Updates, so be sure to subscribe to Hagerty’s YouTube channel to next miss a greasy minute.

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The Redline Rebuild master generally looks forward to the work week. The day Davin anticipates most keenly, however, is teardown day. This week, the Cadillac 365 gets torn down so that Davin can see just what he’s getting into with this oddball V-8.

“Tearing into a new project is always exciting for me,” says Davin about the greasy Cadillac. “It’s during this time that I learn the small differences between the various engines we rebuild. Those details are what keep me coming back to the engine stand.”

Davin spots the first oddity in this engine’s design before he even begins taking it apart. The water pump has a radical design compared to a standard small-block GM product: Each cylinder head, along with the transmission, gets its own dedicated feed. Davin hasn’t seen those long hoses that run under the intake manifold to cool the transmission before—but this probably won’t be his last encounter with them.

An engine’s unique touches are fun to think about … until it’s time to order parts for the rebuild. Davin is most worried about sourcing the pistons and piston rings—the last thing he wants is another Buick straight-eight scenario on his hands. Custom pistons are relatively easy to source; the rings, however, are not so straightforward. Now that the Caddy V-8 is torn down and he’s had a look at everything, Davin will start flipping catalog pages and dialing up suppliers to evaluate his options.

If you want to see how Davin solves the piston-ring problem, be sure to subscribe to the Hagerty YouTube channel.

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Probably the smallest project on Davin’s 2021 roster is this orange Honda Trail 70. It’s a running and riding bike, but it’s far from perfect and could use some love. Teardown time for the air-cooled single-cylinder moves quickly, so let’s get to it.

The Trail 70, or CT 70 as it is also known, came stateside in 1969. It was the perfect bike to get those curious about motorcycles absolutely hooked on riding. The diminutive size made it approachable and comfortable for just about anybody, and the peppy four-stroke, single-cylinder engine was both quick and easy to handle, especially with the three-speed transmission behind it. The Trail 70 is a machine that bike people often say “gives room to grow,” meaning that it’s forgiving enough to learn on, but remains entertaining and rewarding as the rider gains experience.

The orange model Davin is going after looks to be in pretty good shape at first glance, but with each step of disassembly this little machine delivers some piece of hidden bad news. Luckily, none of the items found are catastrophic and each can be easily rectified. Before those fixes can take place, however, everything is going to need a good bath and scrub-down.

That’s for next episode, though. For now, go forth and heed Davin’s call to go work on your projects. And if you don’t want to miss the next Redline Update, subscribe to Hagerty on YouTube.

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Last week, Davin gave a quick recap of the projects that he’ll be tackling this year. This week it’s time to get down to work. Up first: returning the Buick to the Hagerty Learning Garage, which means Davin gets to play with a new toy that recently arrived—a forklift.

“It might seem like overkill, but a forklift is one of those tools you don’t think you’ll use until you have one, and suddenly you find all kinds of uses for it,” Davin says. “For example, it’s a whole lot easier to lift this whole engine run stand into the pickup than to take the time to disassemble it all carry it piecemeal.”

Once loaded, the Buick straight-eight took a short blanket-covered trip to be reunited with the 1951 Buick that it will be bolted back into. The car, covered in fresh paint and nearing the finish line of its customizations, has been waiting for the engine to arrive. It should come together quickly now, but Davin is not at the shop to lend a hand with that; instead he’s there to pick up the 365 V-8 from the ’57 Cadillac that has already been stripped down to its frame, right next to the Buick.

The 365 is next up in the Redline Rebuild series, but if you want to see it torn down you’ll have to wait until next week. Davin says there are some interesting tidbits about this engine, and he’s going to dive into all that on a future episode of Redline Update.

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Tom and the Barn Find Hunter crew have been put in a bit of a pinch by the travel restrictions placed in various parts of the country. Despite what you may think, there is a silver lining: it has allowed the crew to go back and revisit some of our greatest finds, particularly the ones in which we didn’t have enough time to talk about all the good stuff. Time is something we all have in great supply, these days.

One of the biggest stashes of cars Tom has ever stumbled across is also one that really deserves a revisit. Billy Eubanks’ massive collection of cars was nestled into the trees of the Carolinas, and the depth and breadth of the cars in the multitude of buildings meant that even with an extra-long episode back in 2018, we couldn’t even begin to talk about them all.

It’s almost hard to believe that the first episode covering this group of cars had to gloss over this many great finds. More than a few Hemi cars, homologation specials, and Jaguar coupes are strewn about the property, and now two years on you get to hear the whole story. Enjoy this walk with Tom around a property that might be familiar, but it’s all fresh cars for you loyal viewers.

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Everywhere Tom and the Barn Find Hunter team travel, they play a game of getting and chasing leads to scope out where old cars are hiding. Tom usually has one friend or contact in each area he explores, and that person will connect him with a few promising owners or collectors. In the case of his San Diego trip a while back, that initial contact was Peter DaSilva. However, though Tom and crew were itching to hunt for the cars Peter had mentioned, Tom thought it would be fun to drop in on Peter’s shop to poke around the piles of interesting artifacts he had amassed over years.

“This building would be like your bedroom as a teenager if your mother never made you straighten things up,” says Tom before the team heads inside the building. “There are cool things hidden all over the place.”

Of course, Tom tells no lies. Inside is a smorgasbord of vintage racing parts with fascinating backstories—everything from original knock-off spinners sitting on a desk to a 1964 Crosley race chassis lying under a pile of, well, stuff. In the back corner rests a weird piece of art. Peter found a Shelby GT500 years ago and, since it was beyond saving, so he scavenged all worthwhile parts before having it cubed by a crusher in New York. The original idea was to make the final brick of steel into a dining table, but you would need a seriously sturdy floor to support the 1100-pound mass of metal.

Tom then heads off in the woody to investigate another wild automotive lead. He spies a fellow on the side of the road with a Mercedes on a trailer and, naturally, Tom stops to ask whether the driver knew where any old cars were. The man introduces himself as Mike and tells Tom that the crew should stop by his place and check out a few of his own cars. When Tom arrives, he’s greeted by a dune buggy—but probably not the contraption you’re picturing.

The engine is an early flathead, and the rest of the mishmash of parts on the car point to an early-1950s build. Honestly, it looks pretty wild, but we are willing to bet the buggy was mighty fun out on the sand … almost as much fun as Tom had as he rolled around San Diego to find it. This episode goes to show that a vehicle doesn’t even have to be a car or be in a barn to be a barn find—it just has to be interesting.

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Rare cars are commonplace to Tom Cotter and the Barn Find Hunter crew, but every once in awhile there’s a combination of both rare and odd enough that warrants a real look. How does Tom find these cars? The same way that you could—by chatting up the locals at a cars and coffee event. Just asking who has old cars sitting around leads to a small stash just down the road, and the wild mix is definitely worth the price of a cup of coffee.

The dozen-car collection ranges from a flatbed Diamond-T truck to a scratch-built racer powered by a Hillman Imp four-cylinder mill that makes 90 horsepower. The little racer weighs in at only 800 pounds with all fluids on board, an absurd number achieved by the heavy use of aluminum in the construction process.

The real fun of the collection is beneath a low-slung blue cover. Tom’s favorite game while out on the road is to try and guess what’s underneath a car cover only by feel. This one gives him a headache, but even he would admit he’s faced with an uphill battle. With a rollbar sticking tall over the left-hand seat and a shape that’s similar to a few other cars, Tom narrows it down by asking questions about what powers it and where it was produced. In the end he surrenders and pulls the cover off without taking a guess. The 1-of-3 Santee SS (with Buick 215 Aluminum V-8) that greets him is gorgeous, but Tom admits he would not have guessed that. Finally, he got stumped.

The eclectic collection is just another example of one man’s passion represented in cars, a grouping of cool iron and fiberglass that’s begging to get out on the road or track and be driven. For now, it’s Tom who hits the road and heads on to the next find. To see where he goes, be sure to subscribe to the Hagerty YouTube channel and tune in with each new video. Until the next one, take a tip from Tom and go hunt down a few cars of your own.

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The woodie wagon takes a break this week, with Tom focusing less on discovering cars (for once) and instead looking to move a few dirty cars from one resting spot to another. That, to be fair, is a bit of an oversimplification considering he’s dealing with a Ferrari and a Cobra that need to get the shove. But they are mighty dirty, and the building they’re in is set to be destroyed.

The move, however, doesn’t commence until we discuss some of the other interesting rides living in the doomed building. The first is a green Morgan Plus 8. The 215 V-8 powered roadster is one many interesting footnotes of Morgan history because it is an example of a propane conversion car. Mainly a response to emissions regulations, the conversion required removal of the entire fuel system that was replaced with a propane tank and all the hardware to make the engine run smoothly. With no traditional fuel gauge, the glovebox mounted propane tank pressure was the only reference to range the driver would have. Good luck talking the 19-year-old at True Value into topping off your car with a fresh tank.

The other relic worth noting in the garage is a white Triumph TR6. The 1976 convertible has just 9000 miles on it from new, and as Tom points out, it is absolutely a neat piece, but is overshadowed by the Cobra and Ferrari. The original tires and trunk full of bits and pieces make it a restorer’s dream. Many folks consider the sound of the British straight-six to be sublime, but this one is not one many have heard since it has not run in decades.

With the talking done, it’s time to get to work moving cars. The driveway angle is causing issues with getting a trailer right to garage door, so it becomes a careful game of pushing cars. The Cobra and Ferrari leave their places without a fight, but the Morgan and Triumph both initially suffer from locked-up wheels. Luckily for Tom and crew, the restoration shop that came to help out has a set of wheel dollies and a trailer with a winch.

The wheels all eventually broke loose, making for a much less stressful day. The cars all went off to the restoration shop for storage, and the garage was ultimately torn down.

It is not all about finding cars to Tom, but also about keeping them out of danger and putting them in the hands of a loving owner. What will Tom find on the next adventure? You’ll have to subscribe to Hagerty’s YouTube channel to find out with the next video.

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Motoring around Los Angeles, California, in a woody wagon is worth the trip for some folks, but not for Tom Cotter. No, he’s determined to find cars and uncover stories. This week, he meets up with a friend who is reconnecting with his Mini after five years.

That man is Tim Considine, an actor and writer who can trace his roots in Hollywood back decades. His relationship with Tom also goes back many years, and the two are close for a number of reasons—including a trip to the 24 Hours of Le Mans in which luggage was lost and underwear was borrowed. In fact, one of the only things that goes back farther in Tim’s life is this Mini Cooper.

The pale blue Mini entered Tim’s life when he decided that the petite car would be perfect for scooting around L.A. without garnering much attention. He was wrong, but he kept it anyway. The Mini’s a 1968 model, but when Tim purchased it, the ’68 model was not cleared for sale, so the dealership fudged the paperwork and called it a 1967.

Under the hood is a 1275-cc, A-series four-cylinder that is nearly ubiquitous in British cars of the era. However, since the Mini is a featherweight, the 69 horsepower is plenty entertaining. What wasn’t fun, Tim recounts, was the half-decade in the mid-1970s in which he lost the car.

As Tim tells it, he got distracted by a parking spot as he was coming to a stop and just kissed the rear end of a Porsche at a stop sign. The low-speed impact was enough to put the Mini in the shop for repairs and, in sorting out insurance and out-of-pocket expenses, Tim lost the shop’s phone number. That by itself wouldn’t be a crisis—but the shop apparently lost Tim’s contact information, too. The Mini sat in the back of the shop and turned into a private residence for the shop’s guard dog. It took Tim five years to track down the Mini and reestablish his ownership.

Now, Tim drives the Mini on a regular basis. He must really trust Tom, too, because he lets Tom and the Barn Find Hunter crew take a lap of the neighborhood without fearing that he might not see the car again for five years. Tom wouldn’t do that to his friend, though—and if he did, Tim could rest assured he’d have Tom’s beloved woody wagon. Seems like a fair trade to us.

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