The all-new 2021 Bronco takes Ford’s famous nameplate back to its roots as a purpose built off road machine. And make no mistake, the Bronco is a capable package that can be configured to almost anyone’s needs. So what can Chip Foose do (in a drawing) to make it better?  Go the complete opposite way, adding more speed, more sport, and far more street savvy!

The first thing Chip does is trace what makes the 2021 Bronco so special: the perfectly reimagined body made by Ford’s designers. His changes are subtle, including a more car-like windshield and A-pillar, a Mustang-worthy side-view mirror, a subtle body kit over the rocker panels, and a rear spoiler that gently rises from the custom roll bar (B-pillar).  The body is then lowered significantly—more so than a stock Ford F-150 SVT Lightning—for a street stance complete with Mustang Mach 1-inspired wheels.

Chip finishes his rendering for a white body, charcoal fender flares, and body kit, a hood stripe that’s slightly reminiscent of a 1970 Mustang BOSS 302, and replace the Bronco’s turbocharged Ecoboost engines for the Coyote V-8 of the Mustang Mach 1. As Chip suggests, this is the complete opposite of what people expect with a Ford Bronco. And isn’t that what makes it so special?

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Enzo Ferrari called the Series I Jaguar E-type “the most beautiful car ever made,” but the E-type coupe doesn’t get nearly the attention of its convertible counterpart.  Chip Foose has plans to change that. Before our eyes, he’ll transform the E-type coupe into a streetwise sports car with even sleeker design elements.

Chip starts by putting the E-type’s side profile on paper, then gives it a lower greenhouse, more substantial rocker panels and a lowered stance. Of course, he keeps the Jaguar’s signature cab-backward body, thin chrome bumpers, and fastback roofline, but Chip also envisions a faster A-pillar with a less extreme wrap to the windscreen.  Larger wire spoke wheels, cooling vents behind the front wheels, the deletion of vertical bumperettes, and relocated taillights complete the concept. Now that’s how you make an already clean design even cleaner.

Without a doubt, Foose took a nearly six-decade-old design and brought it up to today’s standards. Did he do this classic design justice? Tell us in the comments below; we’d love to hear your thoughts.

This episode is presented by PEP BOYS: For over 100 years, we’ve been under the hood, finding better ways to care for cars and the communities that drive them. We provide expert service, letting our passion for automobiles take the wheel. Stop by your local Pep Boys Auto Service and Tires store and experience the Pep Boys Difference.

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Enjoy Chip Foose stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

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Released as Ford’s answer to Jeep’s CJ-5 and the International Harvester Scout, the first-generation Ford Bronco was a light truck in the purest form: a practical, functional, simple vehicle intended for on- and off-road duty. The clean body lines, minimalist interior, removable doors/roof, and fold-down windscreen made no pretensions to style or luxury; at its core it was a functional design.

Chip Foose understands the first-gen Bronco’s purity of design and appreciates why this off-roader is a highly prized collectible vehicle. But Foose re-imagines the Bronco as a street-savvy cruiser with a high-performance chassis swap, raked hot-rod stance, and a sleeker windshield.  After laying down the basic proportions on paper, Chip begins to tweak the Bronco’s design into a street-worthy custom creation.

As Foose fills out his design, you’ll note the unique windshield and more sporty A-pillar, a slammed-to-the-ground chassis, larger wheels, a hot-rod style billet aluminum grille, 1969 Mustang hood scoop, racing stripes, and a modest spoiler at the rear.  Chip’s design is rendered in classic Shelby Mustang white with blue stripes, which lets the Bronco’s minimalist body speak for itself.

While purists will have their own thoughts about this concept, Foose took everything below the windshield (i.e. the most timeless part of the Bronco) and ushered in a new era of performance and style with time-tested upgrades and a far sleeker windshield for a thoroughly modern interpretation of the Ford Bronco.  That isn’t too far off from the Ford’s vision for the upcoming Bronco, is it?  Sound off in the comments below; we’d love to hear your thoughts.

This episode is presented by PEP BOYS: For over 100 years, we’ve been under the hood, finding better ways to care for cars and the communities that drive them. We provide expert service, letting our passion for automobiles take the wheel. Stop by your local Pep Boys Auto Service and Tires store and experience the Pep Boys Difference.

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