The Maggiore 308M is the restomod Ferrari for a Magnum P.I. reboot

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Maggiore

Italian restomod startup Maggiore has unveiled its first creation—a carbon-bodied Ferrari 308 GTS.

Founder Gianluca Maggiore says he wanted to drive an icon from his childhood but with the safety features and solutions provided by modern technology, and that his Tuscany-based company’s treatment has been completed “with profound respect, creating a historic harmony with the original parts while at the same time breathing new life into its general appearance.”

The new bodywork is wider to incorporate an expanded track, while the biggest difference at the front is the replacement of the car’s iconic pop-up headlamps with narrow LED strips. Additional projector lenses sit below, almost hidden from view until they’re switched on. In profile the 308M is very clean, replacing the slightly fussy straked air intakes with simpler gloss carbon ones. A subtle roof spoiler and accentuated lip spoiler and rear diffuser aid aerodynamics.

Mechanical changes include a rebore of the Quattrovalvole V-8 to 3146 cc, fitment of nodular cast iron liners, forged pistons with a graphite coating and bigger valves. A complete new stainless steel exhaust system has been fitted and there’s a racing clutch and lightweight flywheel. Power is up to 300 hp at 7000 rpm.

Maggiore 308M engine 2
Maggiore

The track is 50 mm wider at the front and 100 mm at the rear and new four-piston Brembo calipers, racing pads, and vented 280-mm discs are installed for increased stopping power. The suspension makes use of Koni racing shocks and adjustable coaxial springs.

The interior deploys carbon fiber, leather, and even marble with materials supplied by American textile specialists Maharam. Bringing the car’s technology up to date is a hi-res sound system from Delta Sigma and even a head-up display. Should you desire, Maggiore will provide a set of matching luggage and even a leather jacket to go with the car.

Maggiore took a year to develop the first 308M and says the conversion costs around €500,000 ($594,000). Oh, and you’ll need to supply them with a 308 to start with, so budget an extra $50,000 to find a decent one.

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