1972 Ferrari 365 GTC/4

2dr Coupe

12-cyl. 4390cc/340hp 6 Weber Carbs

#1 Concours condition#1 Concours
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#2 Excellent condition#2 Excellent
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#3 Good condition#3 Good
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#4 Fair condition#4 Fair
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Model overview

Model description

As production of the 365 GT 2+2 drew to a close in 1971, Ferrari introduced their next 2+2 in March at the Geneva Motor show, the 365 GTC/4. The dawn of the 1970s was noted for an emerging wedge theme, and Pininfarina led the way designing a coupe with a long, low hood and a sloping fastback roofline that would dictate much less headroom for rear passengers than its more upright and classically styled predecessor. The car looked altogether modern, however, unlike the classically styled 365 GT 2+2.

The Ferrari 365 GTC/4’s chassis was based on a shortened version of the one used for the previous 365 GT 2+2, and it inherited the four-wheel independent suspension, power steering, and self-leveling rear shocks of its predecessor as well. In the engine bay was a 4.4-liter V-12 very much like the one in the Daytona. In the 365 GTC/4, however, the V-12 had a wet sump and sidedraft Weber carburetors in order to clear the low hood, as well as lower compression heads. The resultant packages was less power than the Ferrari Daytona, but still very adequate at 320 hp in U.S. specification.

A total of 505 examples were built between from 1971 to 1972, and they can be acquired for less than their 365 GTB/4 Daytona siblings due to slightly milder performance, lack of race history, and styling that is considered controversial by some because of its integrated black plastic bumper treatment in the nose. Potential owners should be aware that some routine work such as valve adjustments are costly secondary to the need for carb removal, and as with all other Ferrari’s with self-leveling suspension, upkeep and fixes in this area can thin the wallet as well. As a result, the Ferrari 365 GTC/4 is a relative bargain today, with savvy enthusiasts noting that it is still an Enzo-era V-12 that rewards its driver with balanced and confidence-inspiring handling, a luxurious and comfortable cockpit, and what some consider to be the best exhaust note of any street V-12 Ferrari.

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