The DeTomaso Pantera GT5-S is rarer than most supercars

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De Tomaso Pantera GT5-S Flickr / Spanish Coches

Ford stepped away from Alejandro De Tomaso’s business as early as 1975, but that wouldn’t stop the Argentinian-Italian from selling his Panteras all the way up until 1992. When American production of Cleveland 351s came to a halt, DeTomaso began sourcing V-8s from Australia, and while still building the bodies and interiors in Modena, the task of fitting the powertrain, exhaust, and exterior trim landed in America. This way, Kirk Evans’ AmeriSport turned Panteras into domestic products. Using this legal loophole put an end to the gray imports triggered by the exclusion from Ford’s dealer network and allowed DeTomaso to focus on getting the Pantera ready for the ’80s. 

Today, most people would be hoping to find an early, unmolested DeTomaso Pantera saved in a barn, and in case you’re also after those classic 1970–74 Tom Tjaarda lines, we hope you’ll find our Pantera buyers’ guide handy in your quest. However, back in 1987, successful individuals who were somehow still lacking Ferrari money were all about the latest and greatest DeTomaso had to offer. The widebody kit and the Countach-style rear wing gave Ghia’s supercar a much more aggressive stance, and while the GT5s featured fender flares and a front air dam made of fiberglass, the GT5-S was an all-steel wonder.

It had 300 American horses imported from Australia, 333 lb-ft of torque, a 5.5-second rush to 60 mph, and did the quarter mile in 14.7 seconds. All this for just $71,950 for the 1987 DeTomaso Pantera GT5-S, a car always ready to impress the staff of Motorweek. Or get saved by a Ford service.

And if you’re wondering if the team behind the new DeTomaso P72 remembers these original Panteras, all I can say is that they did use the company’s camouflaged GTS to mislead the press before the P72’s Goodwood debut…

De Tomaso GTR Wrapped
De Tomaso
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