Continuation series cars to finally hit the road

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R-Reforged

“Continuation series” cars have proved to be massive money-makers for Aston Martin, Bentley, Jaguar and Land Rover, commanding multi-million dollar price tags. However, owners who actually want to use these collectors’ pieces have been out of luck, until now, in the U.K.

Almost all continuation cars fail to meet current regulations so have been restricted to driving on private tracks, but Swiss/U.K.-based R-Reforged is offering a compliance service which will allow such cars to be driven legally on Britain’s roads. With Individual Vehicle Approval granted in the U.K., the cars may also be accepted in other countries under so-called “mutual recognition” agreements. If not, then R-Reforged will work to local regulations, and has already obtained approval for a Ferrari 599 Zagato and Aston Martin DBR2 racing car, for example. R-Reforged says it is currently “talking to homologation specialists” in the U.S.A. According to spokesman Nick Bailey R-Reforged “understands there are several routes it could take developing/expanding on the upgrades it has done for IVA to get a car there.” If there is sufficient interest from the American market then R-Reforged says it will consider developing special kits for American collectors.

R-Reforged CampaignCase
R-Reforged

Seven of 19 Aston Martin DB4 GT Continuations have now had the R-Reforged treatment to allow them to be road-driven. The changes, which can all be reversed, have included new wheel nuts, new side and rear windows, added side-repeaters and retractable fog lamps. The steering wheels and instrumentation have also required changing and an immobilizer has been added. No bad thing, considering the value of these cars.

It takes R-Reforged ten weeks to complete the conversion, and costs around $120,000 for the DB4 GT, but adding drivability to these reborn classics can surely only add to their worth.

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