Chevrolet is bumping the Corvette’s price above $60K, but fear not

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2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Chevrolet/Walker

Chevrolet will add an extra $1000 onto the MSRP of every 2021 Stingray, including the convertible models, starting March 1. This counters the initial plans for the Stingray to stick to its $59,995 release price it had upon its 2020 debut, which included destination fees. It’s common for vehicle prices to creep up in price each year to counter inflation, but Chevrolet held off for several months. Why? Probably, to fulfill the pent-up orders that the new mid-engine C8 had generated that had yet to be filled due to COVID-19 and strike-related production delays.

2021 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Coupe and Convertible
Chevrolet

The C8 has been well-received by owners, would-be owners, and the media, so this incremental bump in MSRP shouldn’t do much to dampen demand. The $1000 increase is pretty much in line with the rate of inflation and, while the sub-$60K price tag made for some great headlines, the entry-level 1LT Stingray accounted for the smallest proportion of sales. Add any option to the base car and the price quickly crests $60,000.

Chevrolet/Walker

The National Corvette Museum posted data revealing that a plurality (46 percent) of C8s were ordered with the 3LT trim package, which starts at $71,945. A significant majority (76 percent) opted for the $5995 Z51 performance handling and brake package. Clearly, most Corvette owners won’t be bothered by the loss of a sub-$60K Stingray.

This price increase, then, is both unsurprising and inconsequential. As is the trend with most manufacturers, Chevrolet can continue to advertise the exciting C8 Stingray with a starting price below $60,000 by ignoring the destination charge. Starting March 1, though, that figure will need to be accompanied by an asterisk.

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