BMW M3 wagon confirmed, but not for America

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While Audi and Mercedes-Benz have for years offered wagon variants of the RS4 and C63 AMG in Europe and other markets, BMW’s M3 has stayed out of the long-roof arena—until now. Munich is officially moving ahead with its first-ever production M3 Touring, although it should come as no surprise that the high-powered machine will not come to American showrooms alongside the upcoming M3 sedan and M4 coupe.

The rapid wagon was first confirmed on BMW-M.com, along with a dimly lit image of the rear end. We like the look—upright rear glass, shapely rear quarter panels, and four menacing exhaust pipes all point to speed and spaciousness in equal measure. For the front end, we’d expect the same gargantuan kidney grille we’ve seen plastered on the recently-leaked M4.

BMW M4 Coupe Engine Bay
BMW
BMW M4 Coupe Shifter
BMW

The M3 Touring should employ the same running gear as its upcoming M3 and M4 siblings, which means a 3.0-liter twin-turbo straight-six and a choice of six-speed manual and eight-speed automatic transmissions. We’d expect the M3 Touring to be pushing 480 horsepower, a figure confirmed by BMW as the tamer of two trims to be offered on the M3 and M4. The rowdier Competition trim, likely to be automatic-only, will bring 510 horsepower and a penchant for eviscerating track corners. Performance testing for the wagon begins this month at the Nürburgring, so we hope to come across footage of this lovely wagon in action in the near future.

BMW M4 Coupe Rear Three-Quarter Track Action
BMW

Much to the despair of American wagon buffs, a BMW spokesperson confirmed that the M3 Touring is not planned for the U.S. market. The decision makes sense, as Americans have for years now voted in favor or taller crossover SUVS and pickup trucks over low-riding haulers, but a five-door M3 is no less tantalizing from afar.

 

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