The worst cars you drove on your driver’s exams

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1966 Pontiac Star Chief Executive Mecum

Getting a driver’s license is a ticket to freedom and exploration, but you must first pass the exam that shows you can safely operate a vehicle. There are good and bad vehicle choices for the exam, and some of our members on the Hagerty Forums had a rougher time than others. Read their stories here. Here are some of the worst vehicles to take a driver’s test in, according our readers.

1960 Chevrolet Biscayne

1960 Chevrolet Biscayne
1960 Chevrolet Biscayne Mecum

Passing parallel parking was likely a chore for user farrell.air and his full-size Chevy, which had no power steering.  That’s not to mention the 119-inch wheelbase and 210-inch overall length. Bigger cars were out there, but even something that size would be a handful for a new driver. After all, those measurements are in line with modern pickup trucks.

1966 Pontiac Star Chief Executive

1966 Pontiac Star Chief Executive
1966 Pontiac Star Chief Executive Mecum

All the trunk space in the world doesn’t help if your feet can’t reach the pedals. User marlowe306 says he was “a late bloomer” and was only 5-foot-1 at age 16, so he took the test “sitting atop a phone book on the expansive bench seat.” What really started the test off right was instructing the examiner that “we couldn’t start until he put his seat belt on.” That’s what you call confidence.

1967 Buick Riviera

1967 Buick Riviera
1967 Buick Riviera Mecum

User peter2 failed the first go because his right foot and the 425-cubic-inch V-8 in his 1967 Buick Riviera thought it was a performance test, leading to him “accidentally” peel out in a corner. It’s OK, you’re among friends, we know it was intentional.

1953 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup

1953 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup
1953 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup Mecum

The advance-design Chevy pickups aren’t hard to drive, but when part of getting comfortable in the truck requires “warning the instructor to put the door handle in the ‘locked’ position to prevent the passenger door from flying open,” you might want to consider driving a different vehicle for the test.

M35 Government Truck

M35 Government Truck
M35 Government Truck Mecum

A full-size car is one thing, but user scrutchmo took full size seriously and used a M35 “deuce and a half” to get the highly-coveted driver’s license. The post does mention this took place at Dreaux Air Force base in France, so maybe the 6×6 truck was the only vehicle available?

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