For Ryan Symancek, a car’s character only comes alive in its true element. RadVentures isn’t a show about staring at museum pieces; it’s a show about feel. The feeling you get when you push a car to its full potential.

This episode focuses on Land Rover’s two classics from the mid-’90s: the Land Rover Defender and the Range Rover Classic.

Ryan opens with the most utilitarian piece of British metal possible, a British Army FV432 Personnel Carrier tank built by GKN Sankey. Comparing the tank to the ruggedness of Land Rover’s early years, Ryan stumbles upon a Range Rover Classic (the prettiest of the Land Rover fleet).

Given free range to explore Monticello Motor Club’s off road trails, the Range Rover is shaken down to see if the added luxury takes away from its usability in the woods. Things are going well, until the Range Rover gets stuck and Ryan is left lost in the forest trying to find his escape pod, a 1994 Land Rover Defender.

Ryan drives the Defender hard, back through the mud and snow, to get to the Range Rover’s location and save it. However, during the expedition back, Ryan realizes he might love the Defender more. He can only drive one truck out of the woods. So what will he go home with?

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

Hagerty’s Editor-at-Large Sam Smith explores what makes the 1963 Lincoln Continental Convertible such a beloved classic car and details what you need to know about buying, owning, and loving this great classic.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

For Ryan Symancek, a car’s character only comes alive in its true element. RadVentures isn’t a show about staring at museum pieces; it’s a show about feel. The feeling you get when you push a car to its full potential.

With this episode, Ryan focuses on the most popular drift chassis, the early ‘90s Nissan 240SX S13.

It’s element is a drift track, so Ryan’s shows up at Raceway Park in Englishtown, NJ with a few 240SXs to see what all the hype is about. These cars are extremely easy to set up and make good drift cars in today’s world, but that’s not exactly what Nissan had in mind when they first went into production.

The Nissan 240SX was the absolute definition of a budget sports car back in the ‘90s, much like the Subaru BRZ or Toyota GT86 are today. So, Ryan shakes down a completely stock 240SX first. However, it doesn’t take long for him to realize just how good they are at sliding! Once infiltrated by Alex Jagger and Matt Bystrak of the Gas Factory drift team, the adrenaline is cranked all the way to one hundred, with some serious tandem drifting!

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

It’s hard to imagine a world without Honda and Lamborghini, but they both first started making cars in the early 1960s.

Honda’s first-ever passenger car (its first “car” was actually the T360 “truck”) was first shown in 1962 as the Sports 360 and Sports 500 prototypes with 356- and 492-cc four-cylinders.

The S500 made it to production a year or so later with a slightly larger 531-cc four, which was eventually supplemented by the 606-cc S600 and the 791-cc S800.

The aluminum engine was the highlight of this tiny roadster (and coupe), with DOHC, hemispherical combustion chambers, and a roller-bearing crankshaft. Its design allowed it to rev to the moon — up to 9500 rpm in the case of the S600 — a redline that no other production passenger-car engine has beat even today.

The car itself was a marvel of simplicity and elegant engineering, with chain-drive independent suspension (later replaced by a conventional solid axle), a 4- or 5-speed synchronized transmission, rack-and-pinion steering, and (later) front-wheel disc brakes.

It was also available in red and white — two colors previously illegal in Japan, as they were reserved for police and emergency vehicles. Soichiro Honda fought the government on this — and won. This is one of many of his victories against the Man, and the Honda Sports series was one of his many victories against the challenges of engineering a car.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

Hagerty contributor Kevin Madsen and veteran race car driver Robb Holland test the BMW M8 Coupe Competition. Is the high-performance coupe more flash than function? Find out how the BMW M8 gets rated.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

All AWD systems will help with additional traction, but the layouts have dramatic effects on handling. Most AWD systems induce understeer, but some can actually help a car handle even better.

Marketing departments often fib about the capabilities of their company’s AWD system. In most cases, no, your car can’t send all of its power to just one axle — unless the other axle is in the air. Manufacturers often leave that little detail out.

To understand what your car’s AWD system can and can’t do, you need to understand its base layout – if it’s a FWD-based car, like a VW Golf R, that happens to have AWD, it can never decouple its front wheels — only add power to the back. It can send 100% of its power to the front wheels, but never more than half to the rears.

If it’s a RWD car like a BMW 3-Series, it can never decouple the rear wheels, only send some power to the fronts. It can send 100% to the rear, just not to the front.

Then, there are fixed-AWD systems like Subaru’s “Symmetrical” AWD. That system sends power to all four wheels — but can only send it all to one axle if the other is, you guessed it, in the air.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

Hagerty contributor Kevin Madsen and veteran race car driver Robb Holland test the new Land Rover Defender, which returns to the U.S. for the first time since 1997. Has it been missed, and is it worth the wait? Find out how the Land Rover Defender gets rated.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

Porsche has just announced the 992 GT3, and it’s the most extreme GT-car yet, with a wholly reengineered double-wishbone front suspension replacing the regular 992’s struts.

This is the 7th-generation of GT3, and the massive engineering signals a sea change for Porsche: the GT3 is now, unquestionably, the most important car in the 911 lineup.

Porsche’s GT-Car Division, run by the talented and charismatic Andreas Preuninger, exists within Porsche’s Motorsport Department — and has made the most desirable 911s of the last 20 years.

It’s time to look back at the 996, 997, 991.1 and 991.2 variants to understand the progression of the GT cars in Porsche’s lineup.

At the Porsche Experience Center’s Los Angeles track, Jason drives the 996 GT3 RS, 997 GT3 RS 4.0, 997 GT2 RS, 991.1 911 R, and 991.2 GT2 RS — while recording high-quality sound — so you can see and hear just how far the GT cars have come.

Think of this as Andy Preuninger’s Greatest Hits, Volume 1.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

Hagerty contributor Kevin Madsen and veteran race car driver Robb Holland test the all-new Audi RS 6 Avant to see whether a wagon can also be considered a sports car. Find out how the RS 6 Avant gets rated.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like

Enjoy Season 1 stories, opinion, and features from across the car world | Hagerty Media

Share

Journalist Sam Smith explores what makes the 1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS such a beloved muscle car and details what you need to know about buying, owning, and loving this great classic.

  • 1
  • /
  • 3

Next episodes

You may also like