5 trucks and SUVs that became more attainable in 2020

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Toyota

While the conversation around collector car and truck prices tends to focus on what’s trending up, we’re here to remind you that there are plenty of desirable machines out there that have, in fact, become more affordable in 2020. We appreciate trucks and 4x4s as much as we do cars, so we’ve searched through the Hagerty valuation data trove for five much-loved models from across the automotive spectrum. Each of these vehicles would make a fine addition to any stable.

1937–1942 Ford pickups

1937 Ford Pickup
Mecum

This range of years for the Ford pickup, from ’37 to ’42, covers two separate vehicle generations that we track (1937–1939 and 1941–1942). Both are down just slightly compared to last year. These trucks, in #2 (Excellent) condition are bringing about $31,000 and $33,000 on average, respectively. This era of Ford truck diverged a bit in style compared to the Ford coupes and sedans that formerly shared grilles with the pickups. Like their car brethren, however, these trucks have a lot of character and they’re powered by the same iconic flathead V-8 family that became the foundation of hot-rodding. Their looks frequently evolved to keep up with the competition, so there’s bound to be one that suits you.

1949–1969 Willys CJ-3

1952 Willys CJ3A
Barrett-Jackson

The quintessential flat-fender Jeep dropped about 15 percent in values this year, with #2 (Excellent) values now at just over $14,000, on average. With an 80-inch wheelbase and flathead four-cylinder engine, these early civilian Jeeps are like mountain goats: they’ll go just about anywhere, but not quickly. The CJ-3B added a new, more powerful F-head engine but it was still better suited to farm and trail use than the highway. Aside from a WWII Ford GPW/Willys MB, does it get more Jeep than this?

1968–1983 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40

1967 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40
Brian and Susan Berdan

Lined up against their Jeep competition, these rugged off-roaders add a bit more room and the practicality of an available hardtop. The long-running FJ40 series was among the hottest 4x4s on the market for years, but it finally is showing some signs of slowing down. Average #2 (Excellent) values are down about $1500, taking them to just above $42,000. Of course, a #3 (Good) condition example that would be a decent driver is much more affordable at $32,700.

1960–1965 Ford Ranchero

Ford Ranchero
Brandan Gillogly

Ford’s Falcon-based ute offers up some pickup practicality in a lightweight package. These fun and functional rides from the Blue Oval were available with inline-six and V-8 engines, just like the Falcon and Mustang that shared their suspension. The Ranchero’s close relation to the Mustang means that there are nearly endless options for tweaking and tuning the suspension to your liking. Want an autocross toy that can easily haul a set of tires and tons of gear to the track? Ranchero has you covered. Of course, there are also plenty of restoration parts available. The world’s your oyster Ranchero!

The average value for a Ranchero from this generation is down just over 13 percent this year compared to last year, with average #2 (Excellent) condition cars coming in under $16,000. Even a late-production version with a 289 isn’t too expensive.

2003–2006 Chevrolet SSR

2006 Chevrolet SSR
Barrett-Jackson

There haven’t been a whole lot of convertible two-door pickup trucks on the market, and even fewer with a retractable hardtop. In fact, the Chevy SSR is the only one we can think of. The retro pickup channeled the look of the 1947–1955 Advance Design models from Chevy, and its chassis evolved from the GMT360 platform that underpinned the Chevy Trailblazer/GMC Envoy/Isuzu Ascender/Saab 9-7x/Buick Rainier/Oldsmobile Silhouette.

The retro looks may be a love it or hate it proposition, but the powertrain is more of a crowd-pleaser. While initially offered only with a 5.3-liter V-8, an LS2 with nearly 400 hp eventually made its way under the curvy hood and it could be equipped with a Tremec six-speed manual. Prices are down almost 8 percent, with #2 (Excellent) examples now coming in under $29,000 on average. It’s not often that an automaker like GM takes a chance on such a zany project, and the SSR will be a car show head-turner for years to come.

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