Carrera GT or Carrera GT speedboat and 3 other Porsches?

Fearless Porsche 28 top view

Porsche’s mid-engine Carrera GT supercar is a beast. Its symphonic mid-mounted V-10 produces over 600 horsepower and sends all that grunt to the rear tires via a six-speed manual gearbox—one of the last European supercars to do so. It's fast, it's thrilling, and it's famously difficult to wrangle. (And it looks sensational in green.)

With a production run of 1270 examples, these cars are fairly uncommon. But not quite as uncommon as the 21 Carrera-GT-inspired speedboats produced between 2007-08.

That’s right, following the Carrera GT’s 2004 launch, Porsche Design Studio teamed up with boatmaker Fearless Yachts to create a limited-run, 28-foot speedboat with styling heavily influenced by the road-going car. Original MSRP for the watercraft was $350K, while the matching supercar could be had for $448K, but their respective values have diverged immensely in recent years.

RM Sotheby’s Monterey auction recently sold a pristine Carrera GT for $940K, but its aquatic counterpart can be had for far less—Powerboatlistings.com has one example currently listed for $150K. This vast price disparity got us thinking, if we went with the boat, what else could we purchase with the remaining $790K to create an awesome all-around Porsche collection? Here’s what we came up with.

Fearless Porsche 28 - $150,000

Fearless Porsche 28 top rear close
Fearless Yachts
Fearless Porsche 28

Low, long, and sleek. There’s no question that this boat is all three. It also possesses more than enough power to look fast while actually going fast, too. A number of the Fearless 28s were equipped with a marinized version of the Viper V-10, but this particular craft is powered by the rarer, 600-hp supercharged V-8 supplied by Mercruiser, pushing its carbon-reinforced hull to an 80-mph top speed.

2019 Porsche Cayenne Turbo - $140,000

2018 Porsche Cayenne Turbo
Porsche
2018 Porsche Cayenne Turbo

A big boat requires a capable tow rig, and what better choice than Porsche's own SUV? The 2019 model offers a twin turbocharged, DOHC V-8 packing 550 horsepower and 567 lb-ft of torque, providing ample grunt to tow the 6000-lb Fearless and do the quarter mile in the 12-second range—just not at the same time. Hell, this thing is almost good enough (whether it’s on the road, track, or dirt) to be the only Porsche in the stable. Almost.

2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS - $227,000

2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Weissach package green
Porsche
2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Weissach package

Filling the niche for weekend driver and dedicated track warrior is the 911 GT3 RS. Equipped with the $18,000 carbon-intensive Weissach package and optional magnesium wheels, curb weight drops to under 3200 pounds and offers a spleen-squishing 0-60 mph sprint of 3.0 seconds flat. And did we mention that its insane 520-hp flat six screams all the way to 9000 rpm? With an impressive statsheet like this, it makes us lament the demise of the old Mezger engine just a little bit less.

1964 Porsche 911 ≈ $423,000

1964 Porsche 911 white 3/4
RM Sotheby's
1964 Porsche 911

What collection would be complete without at least one example of air-cooled, vintage Stuttgart goodness? Only those who have completely insulated themselves from automotive market conversations would be unaware of just how insanely valuable early 911s have become. Average prices for the a 1964 911 are currently hovering around $250,000, but ponying up the remaining $400,000 of our budget would nab a near-perfect car in the #2+ (Excellent) to #1- (Concours) range—pretty much guaranteed to remain desirable to collectors regardless of current market fads. Not only that, but a owning first-year example would provide a reminder of where the brand came from while also serving as driveable proof that Porsche has stayed true to its mission of creating the ultimate mass-appeal exotic.

Tell us your dream Porsche garage in the Hagerty Forums below.