Five Classic Cars That Can Save Your Marriage

Can a great car repair your relationship or, better yet, save it? It’s possible, if you buy a car that fits your personality. We’re here to help, with five collector cars that set the mood and can help restore the romance in your relationship.

1932 Ford V-8 Coupe
It’s well known that outlaws Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker preferred Ford V-8s, America’s first V-8 engine in an affordably priced car. And while we don’t suggest robbing banks, you can indulge in something just slightly wicked. Or, opt for a later vision of waywardness; dress up as a rebellious teen and hop in your little deuce coupe and cruise your favorite nearby pokey parkway. Sometimes, it just feels good to be bad.

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air
It seems that Tri-five Chevys are about as plentiful as a McDonald’s hamburger. But if the fabulous ’50s were your era, it’s hard to argue with this rolling jukebox, with its timeless look and powerful small-bock V-8. And while any number of finned ’50s cars would suffice, this most iconic of Eisenhower-era Chevys is possibly the best car to take to the drive-in and recreate that first date. The best part? You don’t have to be home by 11 p.m.

1963 Aston Martin DB5
She’s in a beautiful gown; you’re in an elegant tuxedo. You climb into the car and head to a posh retreat for dinner and a romantic evening. Such a scenario is easy to imagine in the DB5, the car most closely associated with Agent 007, one sure to shake and stir you both. It debuted in “Goldfinger,” but reappeared in “Thunderball,” “Goldeneye,” “Tomorrow Never Dies” and “Casino Royale.” Just make sure your loved one doesn’t inadvertently hit the ejector seat button. 

1967 Volkswagen Microbus
What better backdrop for the Summer of Love? With 42 horsepower, an air-cooled engine and odd driving position, you’ll remember how, er, “altered” you may have had to be to appreciate this ride. Nevertheless, its leisurely pace allows you to recall that summer 47 years ago, when you both were young and most likely wearing something tie-dyed.

1977 Pontiac Trans Am
The four-wheeled star of the film “Smokey and the Bandit” is better remembered than the acting of Burt Reynolds, Sally Field and Jackie Gleason. A triumph of style over speed, the Trans Am seemed as self-indulgent as the ’70s. And its gold Screaming Chicken hood decal was as tasteful as the era’s clothing. But if you had one, or wished that you did, few cars will take you back to the era of stagflation like this one. But be advised: a Foghat eight-track tape is not included.