15 February 2017

In military collectibles, supply often falls short of demand

When the producers of Fury planned to make a technically correct film about an American World War II tank crew’s exploits, they ran into a problem. The type of tank they wanted to use was nowhere to be found, the result of heavy casualties on the battlefield.

So they had to use the wrong tank.

And that’s a problem that a lot of collectors, or rather would-be collectors, of certain World War militaria can encounter. Many of the most desirable collectibles, like early tanks, airplanes and certain armaments, no longer exist except in photographs, old newsreels and the occasional museum.

In fact, when trying to find an original Voisin airplane, which had become the world’s most common type of aircraft in the years leading up to World War I, one noted collector, Peter Mullin, found there were none left.

“I searched the world,” Mullin recalled. “I found one, in Switzerland, but it turned out to be a replica.”

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., claims to have the oldest surviving Voisin bomber, a Type 8 manufactured in 1916.

“Tens of thousands of Voisin airplanes were manufactured,” Mullin said. “It seems almost unimaginable that they’re all gone.”

The same could be said about certain early models of the once-ubiquitous Sherman tank, which were also manufactured in the tens of thousands.

In Fury, the 2014 film starring Brad Pitt and Shia LaBeouf, a five-man crew in the storied 66th Armored Regiment, part of the U.S. Army’s 2nd Armored Division, pushes into the heart of Germany in April 1945 – just days before the Nazi surrender.

In the film’s telling, the crew was really attached to this particular tank – enough to bestow the name Fury on it – and they’d been fighting together in it since the North Africa campaign in 1942. With that provenance, Fury likely would have been a Sherman M4 or M4A3, each of which went into production in 1942. But here’s the rub: It would have been unlikely for an early-model M4 or M4A3 to have survived all that time. Tank battles in that part of the war, you see, had a 50 percent casualty rate.

In fact, only one Sherman tank – a Canadian one – is known to have survived all the way from the D-Day landing in June 1944 to V-E Day in May 1945. One!

So the filmmakers used a later model, which went into production in late 1944. A number of those examples still exist, as they were produced through the Korean War and even later. Those enjoyed a better survival rate, if for no other reason than they were no longer up against the German juggernauts.

The American Sherman tanks in the movie – 10 were used – all came from the Tank Museum in Bovington, in southern England, which boasts one of the finest and most complete collections of historic tanks.

That’s also where the filmmakers got the movie’s nearly indestructible German Tiger I tank, known as a Panzer, a relic whose production ended with the demise of the Third Reich. The Panzer at the Tank Museum is reputed to be the only surviving Tiger 131 tank still in working order.

That brings up another obstacle facing would-be American collectors who might want a World War II tank: The few that exist are generally “over there.” They were seldom judged to be worth the trouble to ship back to the U.S.

“I heard of a guy in Texas who was supposed to be building an exact replica of a Tiger I,” said Leigh Miller, a collector of tank memorabilia and an authority on tank trivia. “But I’ll believe that when I see it.”

There’s another interesting aspect of appeal for military vehicles like the Sherman tank. Production notes from Fury mention that that tank was “designed and built by Henry Ford,” while the German tanks were masterminded by Ferdinand Porsche. In truth, Ford Motor Company didn’t design the Sherman, but it did build a small number of them. General Motors and Chrysler built the vast majority.

Regardless of who built them, a key reason why so few Shermans have survived is that the early models had a reputation for being death traps. British soldiers called them Ronsons – like the lighter – for how easily they burst into flame.

8 Reader Comments

  • 1
    edward francis home February 21, 2017 at 19:56
    "Regardless of who built them, a key reason why so few Shermans have survived is that the early models had a reputation for being death traps. British soldiers called them Ronsons – like the lighter – for how easily they burst into flame" This is a Myth and was never the case, the advert did not come out until well after the war. secondly the vehicles in your images are incorrectly named.
  • 2
    Bill S Washington DC February 21, 2017 at 08:44
    Great article but a couple of corrections. All Sherman tanks, regardless of variant, are M4s. There is no such thing as an M2 Sherman. The earliest shermans were simply the M4 model. Other models used by the United States during the war included the M4A1, the M4A3, etc. In addition, the tank included in the photos and identified as an M26 Pershing is actually a British tank known as a Centurian.
  • 3
    Andrew St. Louis February 21, 2017 at 10:05
    It is a Panzer (panzerkampfwagen) mk VI, also known as a Tiger I. Not the other way around.
  • 4
    randy becht indiana February 21, 2017 at 10:30
    This is what we do now. We are building the world first M1917 ww1 tank full scale for an Indiana museum.
  • 5
    Mike E Fairbanks, AK February 22, 2017 at 03:29
    The M4A4 pictured is actually a British Firefly.
  • 6
    paolo Knee Deep, California February 24, 2017 at 09:21
    This isn't really a problem. Movies are all about artifice and illusion. They fake it to convince you that you are looking at the Sphinx and not a paper-mache and plaster illusion with no back side. This insistence on authenticity is a waste of money just puffing up the costs of production. It is still better than CGI. And I made a good living renting period vehicles and props to movie productions. A good art department, lighting and camera department can make anything work and it keeps lots of people gainfully employed. And then there are immensely talented artists like Buster Keaton who perform real magic for the benefit of the camera. If a tiny detail like a vehicles authenticity is distracting you from the movie narrative you have a lousy script and a movie that is probably going to bomb. The Tyranny of things and all. Keep the priorities straight. A good script, good acting and direction are far more important. In fact Great acting will overcome a cheap production budget and Orson Welles made Touch of Evil from Whit Master's very thin trashy paperback crime story. Go figure.
  • 7
    Jerry Garrett Las Vegas March 7, 2017 at 03:57
    Thanks to so many readers who took the time to enter their comments here. A tip of the hat to those who can ID the models, their nomenclature and all their many variable features at first glance. The uncertainties of time often make it even that much harder.
  • 8
    Adam M UK March 20, 2017 at 14:47
    "In the film’s telling, the crew was really attached to this particular tank – enough to bestow the name Fury on it – and they’d been fighting together in it since the North Africa campaign in 1942. With that provenance, Fury likely would have been a Sherman M4 or M4A3, each of which went into production in 1942. But here’s the rub: It would have been unlikely for an early-model M4 or M4A3 to have survived all that time" After watching the film on multiple occasions, i dont recollect 'Wardaddy' mentioning that they have been fighing in Fury from the outset. He says that the CREW have been fighting together in places such as North Africa, A Campaign that was finished before the film's setting. It was common practice that once soldiers were not needed in a combat zone anymore, the were transferred, not always with their equipment. The Sherman M4A3E8 was produced as early as januarary of 1944 in a prototype state. It is only logical and feesable that the Crew have not been fighting in the same tank since they joined. The North Africa Campaign saw the extensive use of Valentines, Matildas, M3 Lee/Grants and Other Variants of M4 Shermans by both Americnan and Commonwealth Forces. The Crew is more than likely to have used other shermans or other types of tanks before using Fury.

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