29 August 2014

Griot’s Car Care Tip: Leather care — take pride in your hide

Leather is an expensive, upscale option in most cars so caring for it is essential. There are two vital facets to leather care: cleaning and conditioning. Cleaning is obvious. Conditioning has to do with the nourishment of the leather: the penetration of product into the pores of the hide. This keeps the leather saturated, moist and resilient. The cleaner the pores, the better the leather will accept conditioners. It should be noted that warm leather surfaces are more receptive to conditioning products because the heat opens the pores of the leather, allowing the conditioner to better penetrate and be absorbed. So working in the heat of the day or firing up the seat warmers will be beneficial.

The key is getting the proper amount of cleaning or conditioning for the state of your particular leather. Some products are weighted more to the conditioning side of the ledger, while others are a balancing act between the two, and some are straight cleaners. The age, condition, and previous care habits of your leather will determine which type of product will work best. The accompanying chart is a numeric representation of how all typical leather products stack up in these critical categories.

Product Conditioning Cleaning Protection
Leather Rejuvenator  100 0
Leather Care 70 30
Leather 3-In-1 60 20 20
Leather Care Wipes 50 50
Interior Cleaner 0 100

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1 Reader Comment

  • 1
    J V Hibbing, MN September 3, 2014 at 17:53
    Can you recommend a way to remove brake fluid stain from calf skin leather that is on our dahsboard of our car? Fluid leak happened 12-18 months ago. Haven't been able to remove it with corn starch or baking soda. Suggestions?

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