11 July 2014

You’re Invited To A Free Hagerty Seminar About The Classic Car Market

We invite you to watch online on Thursday, Aug. 14, as our experts look at the generational shift in car collecting during a seminar at the Monterey Convention Center in Monterey, Calif.

The Generational Shift in Car Collecting, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m. EST)

The collector car world is at a crossroads as baby boomers prepare to hand it off to Gen Xers and Millennials. Find out from our panel of experts what cars are going to be timeless blue chippers, what cars are going to be left behind and what to buy now.

The panel includes Dave Kinney, Publisher of the Hagerty Price Guide; Donald Osborne, appraiser, automotive journalist and television personality; Ezekiel Wheeler, Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Automotive Styles; Dan Stoner, Founder of AUTOCULT and Director of New Marketing for Hemmings Motor News; Rob Sass, Publisher of Hagerty Classic Cars magazine; and Rory Carroll, executive editor at Autoweek.

Moderated by Adam Martin, Vice President of The Hagerty Institute for Collector Vehicles.

Please note the new venue for this year:

The Monterey Convention Center
Ferrante Room
1 Portola Plaza
Monterey, CA 93940
Click here for parking information

14 Reader Comments

  • 1
    Gene Trusky PA August 8, 2014 at 11:51
    Continued interest in 50s and 60s MB SLs?
  • 2
    Christopher Adams Maryland August 13, 2014 at 15:09
    No comments
  • 3
    JD Singh United States August 13, 2014 at 16:17
    Excited to listen in.
  • 4
    Michael Heilmann Detroit August 13, 2014 at 17:28
    Early Porsche 911s are red hot and will get up to the 356 values as the market appreciates the fact that there are only 1000 911e Targas. Magnus Walker and Singer 911s will help feed the market hype.
  • 5
    b us August 13, 2014 at 18:14
    Well I can see the real young crowd like 30 or less really never cruised around. I have people I know of that generation that never go anywhere because of high fuel prices when they were in high school. It is a shame when kids have not been to towns 30 miles away. I own a classic as does my father. I am going to be cruising for a long time and hope to buy many unappreciated cars.
  • 6
    David The Bahamas August 14, 2014 at 13:35
    Dialing in from Nassau. Owner of a 993 Turbo, GMC Typhoon, Chrysler 300K Convertible Ram car and more.
  • 7
    Paul Castro Momterey August 14, 2014 at 03:01
    My son and I will be there.
  • 8
    Paul Castro Monterey August 14, 2014 at 03:03
    My son and I will be there.
  • 9
    Scott Tenn August 14, 2014 at 09:07
    I think that your high-performance cars will stay in high demand. The cars that will diminish will be the 'style' cars and the lesser-known brands that most younger people haven't heard of. Some of the 80's and early 90's cars are going to be getting more valuable as those are what middle-age people now were longing for when they were young.
  • 10
    L. F. Nirenberg Buckeye, Arizona August 14, 2014 at 11:26
    Driving since the early 60's I think back to the cars I wish I still owned. My first, unknown to me then, was my most exotic car, a 1959 Moretti 750 coupe. On this car I learned auto repair and maintenance. I.ve owned several Corvairs, Camaros, Firebirds, 280z, 2 Mercedes Benz, and still a 1977 Corvette. My teenage Newphew only knows "Rice Burners". (BLUE)
  • 11
    L. F. Nirenberg Buckeye, Arizona August 14, 2014 at 11:27
    Driving since the early 60's I think back to the cars I wish I still owned. My first, unknown to me then, was my most exotic car, a 1959 Moretti 750 coupe. On this car I learned auto repair and maintenance. I.ve owned several Corvairs, Camaros, Firebirds, 280z, 2 Mercedes Benz, and still a 1977 Corvette. My teenage Newphew only knows "Rice Burners". (BLUE)
  • 12
    Doug Holverson Omaha August 14, 2014 at 11:27
    Is this anything new? Back in the '70s and '80s, I felt lonely being about the only late Boomer that liked Studebakers.
  • 13
    ObiWan Denver August 14, 2014 at 11:32
    I was born in 1940. so I'm not quite a boomer. I'm president of a classic convertible club, and tend to hang out with people of my generation, so I think I'm unlikely to forsake my '55 Bel Air and '55 Corvette; a mid-'90s Impala maybe….
  • 14
    John Fox Phoenix, AZ August 16, 2014 at 14:30
    The experience with cars to Gen-x and millennials is certainly different than the baby boomers. I got my licence in '73. Cars from the 60's were cheap. I grew up learning to fix them because I couldn't afford to pay someone. But they were simple to work on and you needed only basic tools. They younger folks have grown up in a different world. Everything is electronic and complex. You need special equipment. You can't "hopp-up" the engine (now called "tampering") without the risk of fines and legal problems. Cars themselves have an image problem, They aren't cool anymore. Smartphone are. There aren't any Beach Boys singing about how great cars are anymore (She's real fine, my iPhone5). Still, The comradery of owning an old car and being in a neat hobby is still appealing.

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